Saturday, May 30, 2015
SUBSCRIBE | LOG IN
Sign up for the free daily email

INSIDE POLITICS I
RCMP inquiry still leaves unexplored, large grey zone

  
Life at the top becoming dangerously lonely for Harper

The elevation of an insider such as Ray Novak to the top rank of executor of the Prime Minister’s wishes will only compound Harper’s self-enforced isolation.


  
Not so fast, don’t count out Mulcair

Most of Canada’s current government leaders rose from a grave to which they were summarily consigned by the chattering media class over their time in opposition.


  
Liberal revival at play in Quebec, more than a passing bout of Trudeaumania

The more important story of the latest CROP poll is not a still fragile Liberal revival but rather a potentially irreversible slump in PQ fortunes.


  
What’s up with Flaherty?

For a federal finance minister to drop off the Parliamentary radar for a full month is rare. When that month happens to immediately follow the presentation of the budget, it is unheard of.


  
If Liberals can’t win Labrador back, they, and polling industry in for serious introspection

But that does not mean the other parties can or will give up without a fight. The Liberals absolutely need a win in Labrador on May 13, but Stephen Harper could use a victory and Thomas Mulcair—whose party has never run better than a distant third in the riding—needs to fight the perception that the NDP is spinning its wheels under his leadership.


  
Quebec to become ground zero of national battle between NDP and Liberals

Expect that fight to get underway just as soon as the new federal Liberal leader is in place later this month, and don’t expect either party to take prisoners.


  
Harper Conservatives dismantle environmental oversight infrastructure

Since he has gained control of both Houses of Parliament, Prime Minister Stephen Harper no longer bothers to pretend that the environment in general and climate change in particular is a major preoccupation, let alone a priority of his government.


  
Liberal Party luring tentative converts to a defining Grit cult

The fact is that the pro-Trudeau trend is at least as solid among the Liberal base as it is with the fans who have flocked to the party as part of the leadership campaign.


  
NDP entitled to stake out distinct referendum approach

Indeed, as NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair casts himself as a contender for the job of prime minister, he has a duty to give voters fair warning of his position on such fundamental issues.


  
Quebec could obtain right to assisted suicide

But in the real world of 2013 Canadian politics, implementing the expert panel’s prescriptions will almost certainly lead to a collision between Quebec and Stephen Harper’s government.


  
Electoral reform could improve health of Canada’s federal politics

  
Federal Liberals looking for sacrificial lamb to run against rock star Trudeau

Liberal MP Denis Coderre is not volunteering for the task.


  
McGuinty’s no political spring chicken, but he’d be a star Grit leadership candidate

Upon his resignation as premier, he could have bolted the door shut to a federal leadership run instead of courting inevitable speculation as to a future on Parliament Hill.


  
Trudeau can do no wrong in starry eyes of Liberal old guard

But if Justin Trudeau is to convince Canadians that he is the agent of a belated Liberal rebranding, it might help if he did.


  
Conservatives and NDP have already factored in a Trudeau victory: Hébert

But Stephen Harper’s strategists would not be experts at retail politics if they had not spotted at least two of their vulnerabilities to a Trudeau-led Liberal party.


  
Dynamics of the 41st Parliament depressingly clear

  
Harper can’t catch a break on provincial elections

In the year and a half since they secured a federal majority, the federal Conservatives’ success has translated into more provincial resistance than acquiescence.


  
Is this Charest’s real farewell or just a strategic goodbye?

  
Parliamentary Calendar
Saturday, May 30, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
As Justice Minister Peter MacKay prepares to announce he's is leaving politics, here's a look back at his time on the Hill May 29, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay joined by Senator Bob Runciman, Tim Uppal, and Corneliu Chisu met with the Amalgamated Transit Union and the Canadian Urban Transit Association to mark the passing of Bill S-221, which amends the Criminal Code to address assaults against public transit operators.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

On May 12, the day UN rapporteur James Anaya released his report on the situation of indigenous peoples in Canada, families of missing and murdered women demonstrated on the steps of Parliament Hill. Mr. MacKay and fellow Conservative MP Joy Smith happened to be on the steps at the same time, for a photo opportunity, where a life jacket-donning Mr. MacKay was confronted by the women asking for his help. He said he would be willing to sit down and talk about the issue of missing and murdered women. When the meeting in Mr. MacKay’s office was scheduled, it was arranged symbolically to be held on the six-year anniversary of Mr. Harper’s apology to First Nations for residential schools, said Mr. Fiddler.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay behind the bench at a 2013 Conservative Party hockey game.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay with his wife Nazanin Afshin-Jam and their son Kian.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay with Laureen Harper at the 2013 Sandbox Canada event on Sparks Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay, getting meta with his BlackBerry, alongside fellow caucus colleagues in 2013. From left: Bernard Valcourt, Shelly Glover, Peter Van Loan, Leona Aglukkaq, and Diane Finley.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

In committee with junior defence minister Julian Fantino, on March 13, 2012. During the meeting the pair said the government would commit to procuring the F-35 joint single strike fighter jets.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Then-U.S. Secretary of Defence Robert M. Gates and Peter MacKay during his tenure as Defence minister.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay and Tim Powers. Mr. MacKay broke his arm while being tackled in a rugby game on the Hill on May 27, 2009. He was playing for the Canadian Forces team, against the Ottawa Irish Rugby Club, which Mr. Powers is a part of. Apparently Mr. MacKay barely flinched when the medics pushed his elbow back in place, and was doing interviews five minutes later.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay with the Brazilian foreign minister Celso Luiz Nunes Amorim in a 2007 joint press conference following their bilateral meeting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay signing... as he was sworn in with the rest of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Cabinet Feb. 6, 2006.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

July 20, 2006 Mr. MacKay speaks to press after a technical briefing in Ottawa over concerns about the evacuation of Canadians from Lebanon.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay tossing around a football on the Hill with Mr. Harper in 2005. Other photos from this afternoon on the lawn were cause for some contention for Mr. Harper at the time.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay, Jack Layton, and Anne McLellan in 2004, seen here debating the Throne Speech with CBC's Don Newman.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Then-leader of the Progressive Conservatives Peter MacKay, and Stephen Harper, then-leader of the Canadian Alliance announced on Oct. 16, 2003 that they agreed to join their two parties. 'Our swords will henceforth be pointed at the Liberals, not at each other,' Mr. Harper said at the time.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE