Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS I
Harper gets presented with two equally unpalatable notions

Harper will have to decide how much he can afford to stake on Quebec Premier Charest


  
History shows despite media outrage, the Prime Minister will have his way

As for the opposition parties who currently pay lip service to the cause of journalistic access, the evidence also suggests that once in power, they will pick up where Prime Minister Stephen Harper leaves off. Stay tuned.


  
The weird parallels between Parti Québécois and federal Liberals

If the Liberals are to quickly grow out of opposition, they too will have to avoid sticking their heads in the sand of wishful thinking.


  
Harper's media encounters more like army briefings

Stephen Harper has given himself a total of 13 days between the election and his swearing-in to come up with the first Conservative Cabinet in more than a decade. In 2004, Martin took 22 days to put together his second Cabinet in six months.


  
For incumbent Prime Minister Paul Martin, the best-case minority scenario could also be the most dangerous

A minority Liberal government that had a bit of time ahead of it might be more tempted to change the guard quicker than one whose survival would hang by a thread.


  
PM's departure required to cleanse Liberal brand

  
Canadians tend to look to Ottawa in times of crisis and at such times, voters also usually prefer activist governments

From one incident to the next, the Martin team has become more adept at tailoring its response to the national mood, not necessarily to the most pressing needs in the afflicted areas.


  
Gomery report to introduce new clouds on Liberal horizon

If the government plans to get to a spring election with its feet dry, it will have to weather the first Gomery downpour.


  
Michaëlle Jean will turn out to be hard to dislike or to dismiss

Until the very last minute, Liberal strategists had feared that the installation of Michaëlle Jean as governor general would add fuel to the recent fire over her political allegiances. They need not have worried.


  
Gomery opens a window for those desperate enough to try to oust Conservative Leader Harper before the election

Where the Tories are more divided is on whether going to the polls under the current leader is truly the lesser evil.


  
Politicians shadow-boxing on free-trade pact

In his criticism of the government to date, Stephen Harper has strived to keep his eyes focused on the smaller softwood picture, but there are clear limits to that strategy, says Chantal Hébert.


  
Signs don't favour an election before winter

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, December 31, 1969
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Chantal Hébert's Morning After book launch at Métropolitain Brasserie in Ottawa: Sept. 24 Sept. 30, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser, a former Toronto Star Hill journalist, and Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, a former Conservative and Reform Party staffer.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert, national affairs columnist for The Toronto Star and author of The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was. Ms. Hébert launched her book on Sept. 24 in Ottawa at the Métropolitain Brasserie where plenty of political players turned up from the Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jean-Pierre Kingsley, Canada's former chief electoral officer, and Quebec Liberal Senator Dennis Dawson.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson, a partner at i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising, who hosted the book launch. Mr. Anderson is a panellist on CBC's At Issue along with Ms. Hébert and Andrew Coyne.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Kate Purchase, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Quebec Liberal Sen. Dennis Dawson, Jim Patrick of Shaw Communications, and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser and Bruce Anderson of i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Patrick Kennedy, director of government relations for CF Industries, flips through a copy of Chantal Hébert's book, The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, is the happy new owner of The Morning After.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert and former Conservative MP Ted Menzies.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Journalist Daniel L'Heureux, Mylène Dupere, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, and Jean Lapierre, who helped Ms. Hébert write the book. Mr. Lapierre is also a former Bloc Québécois MP who later joined Paul Martin's Liberals and was a federal Cabinet minister. Today, he's a pundit.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Leslie Swartman, director of public affairs at MDA Information Systems, and former Liberal Cabinet minister Jean Lapierre. Ms. Swartman used to work for Mr. Lapierre when he was in the Paul Martin Cabinet.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Anne Marie Creskey, publisher of The Hill Times, and Hill Times reporter Rachel Aiello.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Former Conservative MP Ted Menzies and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson and Chantal Hébert.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Michel Liboiron, director of government relations at CIBC, and Postmedia News reporter and columnist Stephen Maher.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE