Wednesday, April 1, 2015
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INSIDE POLITICS I
Trudeau’s speech more hard-hitting, more high-risk

For all Tom Mulcair’s success or, perhaps, because of it as the prosecutor-in-chief of the government in Commons, his profile outside Quebec remains both lower and not as voter-friendly as Justin Trudeau’s.


  
Tory, Bloc rhetoric goes beyond judge’s ruling on niqabs

Is there a degree of religious-based anti-womanism that the Prime Minister believes Canadian values can accommodate and if so, who should draw the line? Does he seriously think that it is for governments to make freedom of religion a two- tiered right?


  
Patrick Brown offers federal preview

Under the guise of a dark horse bid to replace former leader Tim Hudak, Conservative MP Patrick Brown is serving them a pre-emptive lesson.


  
Good politics could make better policy

Asking the Supreme Court for a six-month extension so that a new Parliament can deal comprehensively with the matter of assisted suicide would be one of those moments.


  
NDP has more to gain by refuting Bill C-51

As counterintuitive as it may seem, opposing the bill is also less perilous politically for the NDP than supporting it.


  
Political calculus behind Trudeau’s decision to offer Adams political asylum does not easily add up

For an MP who was growing uncomfortable with her party, Adams certainly fought hard for a Conservative nomination in the 2015 election.


  
PM seemed blindsided by Baird’s exit

That may explain why the opposition parties were more effusive in their praise of the departing minister in the House than was the statement issued by the Prime Minister’s Office.


  
Quebec corruption inquiry losing its way

Nothing short of a bulletproof final report—whenever it finally does come—will shore up its battered credibility.


  
Tories have only modest hopes in Quebec

The addition of 27 new ridings in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia gives the ruling party quite a bit of room west of Quebec to make up for possible losses in Atlantic Canada.


  
Fixed election date hurting sound policy-making

When all is said and done the side effects of the remedy of a fixed-date election law are turning out be more harmful to sound policy-making than the ills it was meant to cure.


  
Provinces, not Harper, speak for Canada now

It is increasingly hard to see how the federal government can exercise leadership or advance an agenda for the country from an Ottawa bunker.


  
Don’t expect allegations to be cleared up soon

These are allegations that would do serious damage to anyone’s reputation. That damage is compounded when they are levelled—as is the case in this instance—at elected individuals whose stock in trade is public trust.


  
Liberals MPs’ banishment from party fold stands to be permanent

When all is said and done, the grim political fate that Massimo Pacetti and Scott Andrews have incurred for their alleged sins will go a longer way to deter future Parliamentary offenders than any after-the-fact remedy.


  
Sexual harassment allegations against CBC star Ghomeshi unleash floodgate

Few are more vulnerable to allegations of personal misconduct than elected politicians and there has long been an implicit gentlemen’s agreement (pun intended) between the parties to deal with such matters under the radar. Until now.


  
All that’s missing is actual general election call

  
Trudeau immediate political casualty of war of words

It is not that Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau necessarily chose the wrong camp, but having picked a side in the most sensitive policy debate to have come his way since becoming leader, he then failed to distinguish himself in action.


  
Canada’s next Parliament will find active Islamic State file waiting for it

One way or another though the international engagement against Islamic extremists will not be resolved between now and next year’s federal election.


  
Justin Trudeau’s Sun Media ban misses the target: Hébert

By shutting out all Sun Media journalists, Justin Trudeau is taking the wrong approach in his protest against Ezra Levant’s grotesque attack on him and his family.


  
Rathgeber book tells bleak story of Canadian politics

Worse than the troubling conclusions of the likes of Graham Steele, Brent Rathgeber and others is the fact that while they don’t lack for ideas to fix Parliamentary democracy, all doubt that the impetus for reform is strong enough to break down the systemic barriers to change. And on that score they have a point.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
A preview of Parliamentary precinct renos March 30, 2015

Photograph courtesy of Public Works
An artist's rendering of what the outside of the Sir John A. Macdonald building will look like when construction is complete. A new addition has been built, connected to the main heritage space by a glass atrium. Public Works says work wraps up this month, aside from a few finishing touches.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A cut-away view at the glass-walled atrium that will connect the historic Sir John A. Macdonald building space, formerly the Old Bank of Montreal building, to its annex addition.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
An artist's rendering of the interior of the Sir John A. Macdonald building's historic space, which used to house bank tellers and will soon host special Parliamentary events.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A look at the multi-purpose room space that will be located in the new addition to the Sir John A. Macdonald building.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A digital overhead shot of the West Block as it will look after construction. The building’s courtyard is topped by a glass-domed roof.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
The temporary House Chamber will be in an infill inside West Block’s courtyard, but MPs will be able to access the space without stepping outside, as the entire courtyard will be topped with a glass-domed roof.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
An artist’s rendering of the inside of the temporary House Chamber to be located in West Block’s courtyard.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A rendering of a lobby area to be located near the West Block’s temporary House Chamber.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
The House of Commons is set to add 30 new MPs after this year's election, meaning 30 new seats are needed in the Chamber. Pictured is a prototype of the new seating arrangement, which will be installed in the current Chamber after this year's election. West Block's temporary House Chamber will accommodate all 338 MPs.
Photograph by Public Works
A prototype of the new seating arrangement was set up in the House Chamber last year for some MPs to test out. Having theatre-style seats in the back two rows of the Chamber will allow 30 more MPs to sit in the current House Chamber.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A blueprint of plans for the West Block, including the temporary House Chamber, which will be converted to committee space when renovations to Centre Block are complete. Workers have to dig down about two storeys to build up a foundation to support this new addition.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
West Block will have fully renovated committee rooms once complete, similar in appearance to this rendering.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
A view of part of the Wellington Building’s lobby, set to include a green wall.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
An artist’s drawing of a common space to be located in the Wellington Building.
Photograph courtesy of Public Works
An example of what the Wellington Building’s committee rooms will look like, of which there will be 10 total.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE