Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS
Almost everyone claimed to 'know' Jack—it's a remarkable legacy

  
Duceppe not ready for political sidelines yet

Former Bloc Québécois leader Gilles Duceppe's name figures prominently on most non-official short lists to replace PQ Leader Pauline Marois.


  
Canada's voting legislation 'archaic'

Canadians are used to real-time information, never more so than on election night, regardless of where they live.


  
Canadians can't share economy lessons with U.S.

  
NDP may want to reconsider who they have at helm

If Jack Layton, who is battling cancer, cannot return to the House of Commons Sept. 19 as he has vowed, Turmel will be a gravely wounded interim opposition leader as she rises to take on Harper.


  
Layton is bravely in the fight of his life

Raised over beers at the pub, discussed at dinner parties, dissected over lunch in the shadow of Parliament Hill, the issue of Jack Layton's health never delved into the type of maliciousness that often poisons Ottawa's gossip mill.


  
Conservative TV spots miss Ignatieff's weaknesses in targeting strengths Canadians usually admire

Voters have good reasons to be skeptical of Michael Ignatieff. They're just not the same reasons Stephen Harper is rolling out in ads savaging the Liberal leader as a grasping prodigal son home to seize power in an illegitimate coalition with socialists a


  
In Ottawa, as in Washington, abuse now common tongue of policy debate

Early warning or wake-up call, the Tucson carnage tugs sleeves here. It urgently reminds that political rhetoric has consequences and that public debate is poisoned by toxic politics.


  
Prime Minister Harper could secure the majority he wants

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's strength is an unusually creative capacity to see federal politics differently. His weakness is running headlong into solid objects.


  
Canadians aren't imposing discipline on politicians by punishing party in power.

In a capital as sensitive to authority as this one, all that's required to better protect the public interest is a clear signal from the Prime Minister that watchdogs are to be respected, not gutted.


  
Harper demonstrates flair for creating nothing from something

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's deft strokes over the past year are brushing aside a challenge to the extraordinary, between-elections power of prime ministers and painting over a Conservative fault.


  
WikiLeaks are making voyeurs of us all

Lessons, too, drip from the leaks. To assume the privacy of any message dispatched into the ether of an information age is patently foolish.


  
Harper master manipulator of new politics he largely invented

In less than five years this Prime Minister has reduced once dominant Liberals to a rump and is closer than it appears to the majority he covets.


  
Whatever his weaknesses, Harper remains his party's greatest strength

In one way PM Stephen Harper's dominance need not change with Nigel Wright's arrival. In another way the status quo should not survive Guy Giorno's departure.


  
Back to drawing board for a Prime Minister facing a disillusioned electorate

It doesn't seem too much to ask, or too little to expect, even from those so consumed by their lust for power that civility is just another tactic and making Parliament work is simply another means to the same end.


  
Harper encourages True Blue loyalists to trust gut, not evidence

That's a strange pitch from any leader guiding a country in an information age. It's simply bizarre coming from one schooled as an economist, says James Travers.


  
Conservatives junking mandatory long-form census

The feds are blinding Canadians to truths they need to know about themselves.


  
Harper needs to bring home what he's learned abroad

Conventional wisdom holds that he has matured from an awkward homebody to a Prime Minister comfortable among world leaders.


  
Speaking truth to power takes more courage than most can muster here

Four years after diplomat Richard Colvin began telling his superiors what they didn't want to hear, the coverup is complete.


  
Liberals squander serial opportunities to regroup, rebuild

Much of the buzz about an ill-defined union with the NDP is cover for the apparently endless Liberal leadership struggle.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE