Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS
Almost everyone claimed to 'know' Jack—it's a remarkable legacy

  
Duceppe not ready for political sidelines yet

Former Bloc Québécois leader Gilles Duceppe's name figures prominently on most non-official short lists to replace PQ Leader Pauline Marois.


  
Canada's voting legislation 'archaic'

Canadians are used to real-time information, never more so than on election night, regardless of where they live.


  
Canadians can't share economy lessons with U.S.

  
NDP may want to reconsider who they have at helm

If Jack Layton, who is battling cancer, cannot return to the House of Commons Sept. 19 as he has vowed, Turmel will be a gravely wounded interim opposition leader as she rises to take on Harper.


  
Layton is bravely in the fight of his life

Raised over beers at the pub, discussed at dinner parties, dissected over lunch in the shadow of Parliament Hill, the issue of Jack Layton's health never delved into the type of maliciousness that often poisons Ottawa's gossip mill.


  
Conservative TV spots miss Ignatieff's weaknesses in targeting strengths Canadians usually admire

Voters have good reasons to be skeptical of Michael Ignatieff. They're just not the same reasons Stephen Harper is rolling out in ads savaging the Liberal leader as a grasping prodigal son home to seize power in an illegitimate coalition with socialists a


  
In Ottawa, as in Washington, abuse now common tongue of policy debate

Early warning or wake-up call, the Tucson carnage tugs sleeves here. It urgently reminds that political rhetoric has consequences and that public debate is poisoned by toxic politics.


  
Prime Minister Harper could secure the majority he wants

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's strength is an unusually creative capacity to see federal politics differently. His weakness is running headlong into solid objects.


  
Canadians aren't imposing discipline on politicians by punishing party in power.

In a capital as sensitive to authority as this one, all that's required to better protect the public interest is a clear signal from the Prime Minister that watchdogs are to be respected, not gutted.


  
Harper demonstrates flair for creating nothing from something

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's deft strokes over the past year are brushing aside a challenge to the extraordinary, between-elections power of prime ministers and painting over a Conservative fault.


  
WikiLeaks are making voyeurs of us all

Lessons, too, drip from the leaks. To assume the privacy of any message dispatched into the ether of an information age is patently foolish.


  
Harper master manipulator of new politics he largely invented

In less than five years this Prime Minister has reduced once dominant Liberals to a rump and is closer than it appears to the majority he covets.


  
Whatever his weaknesses, Harper remains his party's greatest strength

In one way PM Stephen Harper's dominance need not change with Nigel Wright's arrival. In another way the status quo should not survive Guy Giorno's departure.


  
Back to drawing board for a Prime Minister facing a disillusioned electorate

It doesn't seem too much to ask, or too little to expect, even from those so consumed by their lust for power that civility is just another tactic and making Parliament work is simply another means to the same end.


  
Harper encourages True Blue loyalists to trust gut, not evidence

That's a strange pitch from any leader guiding a country in an information age. It's simply bizarre coming from one schooled as an economist, says James Travers.


  
Conservatives junking mandatory long-form census

The feds are blinding Canadians to truths they need to know about themselves.


  
Harper needs to bring home what he's learned abroad

Conventional wisdom holds that he has matured from an awkward homebody to a Prime Minister comfortable among world leaders.


  
Speaking truth to power takes more courage than most can muster here

Four years after diplomat Richard Colvin began telling his superiors what they didn't want to hear, the coverup is complete.


  
Liberals squander serial opportunities to regroup, rebuild

Much of the buzz about an ill-defined union with the NDP is cover for the apparently endless Liberal leadership struggle.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, December 31, 1969
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Chantal Hébert's Morning After book launch at Métropolitain Brasserie in Ottawa: Sept. 24 Sept. 30, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser, a former Toronto Star Hill journalist, and Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, a former Conservative and Reform Party staffer.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert, national affairs columnist for The Toronto Star and author of The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was. Ms. Hébert launched her book on Sept. 24 in Ottawa at the Métropolitain Brasserie where plenty of political players turned up from the Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jean-Pierre Kingsley, Canada's former chief electoral officer, and Quebec Liberal Senator Dennis Dawson.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson, a partner at i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising, who hosted the book launch. Mr. Anderson is a panellist on CBC's At Issue along with Ms. Hébert and Andrew Coyne.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Kate Purchase, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Quebec Liberal Sen. Dennis Dawson, Jim Patrick of Shaw Communications, and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser and Bruce Anderson of i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Patrick Kennedy, director of government relations for CF Industries, flips through a copy of Chantal Hébert's book, The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, is the happy new owner of The Morning After.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert and former Conservative MP Ted Menzies.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Journalist Daniel L'Heureux, Mylène Dupere, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, and Jean Lapierre, who helped Ms. Hébert write the book. Mr. Lapierre is also a former Bloc Québécois MP who later joined Paul Martin's Liberals and was a federal Cabinet minister. Today, he's a pundit.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Leslie Swartman, director of public affairs at MDA Information Systems, and former Liberal Cabinet minister Jean Lapierre. Ms. Swartman used to work for Mr. Lapierre when he was in the Paul Martin Cabinet.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Anne Marie Creskey, publisher of The Hill Times, and Hill Times reporter Rachel Aiello.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Former Conservative MP Ted Menzies and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson and Chantal Hébert.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Michel Liboiron, director of government relations at CIBC, and Postmedia News reporter and columnist Stephen Maher.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE