Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
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IN THE HOUSE
Get ready for a clusterfrig this fall on the Hill: Joe Jordan

As the next federal election approaches, the operations of Parliament will become an even greater extension of party politics and, essentially, we will be able to witness the speeding up of a broken machine.


  
Whateva, I do what I want!

What we also can’t have is the status quo; the overwhelming response to Justin Trudeau’s action should be a clear signal that Canadians want change.


  
Joe Jordan: we’re setting the table for the next election

Governments call elections when they think they can win them. Everything else is communications.


  
Hallelujah, the House has risen!

When your reaction to Question Period is identical to the feeling you get when someone scrapes chalk on a chalkboard, it is well and truly time to pull the old plug.


  
Take none of hewing, crying over private members’ business at face value

In this particular case, the earned media generated around the issue will more than make up for the eventual procedural beat down.


  
Seven things that will make a bad Parliament worse: read 'em and weep

Parliament doesn’t need advice, it needs an intervention.


  
On top of omnibus legislative casserole, feds intend to add a ‘screw you’ spice with MP pension reform, says Jordan

  
Politics to eclipse policy in spring session

Expect the unexpected, zigging will be the new zagging, outrage will become contagious, perspective will be jettisoned form the lexicon and doing the right thing will become entirely situational. But that’s politics.


  
This government gets a B-minus grade

The key to staying in power is to keep the ones who hate you away from the ones who don’t know, and that is largely an exercise in communications.


  
House, media distracted by plane rides, gold business cards

We are facing uncertain economic times, increasing global instability, and a federal/provincial Health Accord negotiation that could fundamentally alter the role of government and the relationships between governments in this country.


  
One impeachable rule in politics: the electorate is never wrong

If we work backwards from that absolute truth, we can begin to sort out what happened, perhaps why it happened and, most importantly, what it might mean going forward.


  
If MPs don't get a handle on the sorry state of this political environment, voters will

The good news is that we seem to be actually having a semi-serious discussion about the issue. In the end, I hope that the current crop of Parliamentarians see the opportunity that these types of discussions may afford them.


  
Parliamentary machine headed in wrong direction: It's time to fix it!

Joe Jordan's list of how to make Parliament work better.


  
Electile dysfunction: constant election threat hurts Parliament

It permeates everything they do, it shortens strategic planning time frames to about three minutes and it sidelines a competent and professional civil service by the ongoing reinforcement of the principle that 'politics' trumps 'policy.'


  
The new normal: minority Parliaments aren't so bad

Of course, it will never last. I am giving this Parliament about another 10 months.


  
The 'Steve-leave' affair and our sensational political crisis

  
Jordan's 'top 10 mistakes' new MPs should not make

Politics is like a hallucinogenic drug, it tends to intensify what already exists. Keep in mind that there is little correlation between winning an argument and being right.


  
Time to watch the backroom fur fly!

Prime Minister Harper has been convinced by his strategists that a majority win is possible. It's simply the way the guy's wired.


  
Time to engage in a little election speculation

Of the 33 government bills currently in the pipe, the most logical choice for an election culprit would be Bill C-10.


  
Opinion markets inundated by 'MPs-behaving-badly' theme, time to refresh

So here are three small measures that I feel should contribute to all MPs holding their heads a little higher.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE