Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
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IMPOLITIC
Violence begets harmony, even love for a moment

Ottawa is not an innocent city and never has been. What the attack did, in the immediate aftermath, was unleash an unprecedented display of warmth and solidarity among politicians, as remarkable as it will be fleeting. For a few astonishing hours, love really was stronger than anger.


  
New book turns a fictional fire hose on Senate’s cynical shenanigans

The book is exceptionally timely, dealing as it does with spending scandals, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Supreme Court reference and the abrupt dwindling of the Red Chamber’s stature and seriousness.


  
Ottawa distracted by trifles, while real trouble looms

  
An election about policy? Look no further

Real problems are only lamented and never seriously addressed. Unfortunately, we have an election to get through first.


  
Canada pretends to do something about ISIS

Unfortunately, history suggests these militias are unreliable allies; partners of convenience, at best, driven by sectarian rivalries but united in mistrust of the West.


  
Everyone wants ‘action,’ no one ready to act

  
Justin The Inevitable

Trudeau promises relief from the tiresome and hateful bickering that constitutes political discourse—a discourse grown more crude and savage during the Harper years.


  
Harper’s foreign doctrine: the responsibility to object

As a response to villainous foreign regimes and their brutal suppression of women, and detested minorities it is pretty anemic.


  
Trudeau should think twice before legalizing pot: Susan Riley

Early polls suggest Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau will win youth support, but lose seniors with his support for legalization—but that, for a significant majority, pot will not be a ballot box question in 2015.


  
Northern Gateway too illogical to survive: Riley

Of all the oil pipelines on offer these days, none are as politically provocative, environmentally menacing, difficult to build, and—to use the technical term—totally nutty, as the Northern Gateway.


  
Harper ‘couldn’t care less’ and that works: Riley

Prime Minister Stephen Harper doesn’t waste time explaining. His leadership style is authoritarian, arrogant, and sometimes hostile. It shouldn’t work, but, so far, it has.


  
Betrayal commonplace in politics

It’s time we started exposing and embarrassing the cheaters, not just their victims.


  
Susan Riley: does ‘stupid’ always work in politics?

  
Ottawa no-show on needed pension reform, so premiers leap in: Susan Riley

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has refused to enrich the Canada Pension Plan, which currently pays a maximum of $12,500 annually to those who contribute during their working years.


  
Unpacking Quebec’s charter of values, then junking it

  
Talented Redford pushed out, Rob Ford hangs on

  
Why the latest unity ‘crisis’ doesn’t feel critical

Pauline Marois is trying, with some success, to ride to victory on the backs of Quebec’s religious minorities by appealing to inchoate fears, particularly in rural Quebec, of Islamic fundamentalism.


  
Earth to politicians: slogans don’t create jobs

  
Moral clarity much easier from a distance: Susan Riley

The proposed Quebec charter of values is a petty, mean-spirited, dangerous and unnecessary piece of legislation unworthy of Canada and, if it passes, deeply damaging to Quebec’s reputation. Now why doesn’t someone in Ottawa say so?


  
Has tax cutting gone too far?

If there is never an appetite for overall tax increases, a case can be made for targeted hikes.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE