Monday, Aug. 31, 2015
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ECONOMY & INNOVATION
Harper government has enormous obligation to farmers if it abandons supply management

  
Party platforms coming up short on environment

Canadians need, before the October election, to know which political party has the most credible action plan as the world struggles to avert catastrophic climate change.


  
Productivity central to Canada's future well-being

Raising our productivity performance for a better economic future is not a quick-fix challenge. It will take much effort, including better understanding of why productivity performance is weak.


  
Premier Notley's challenge: take Alberta to its next stage of development, including a more sustainable energy industry

There are two big factors working against the oil sands that will curb future growth. One is economic, with the dramatic fall in oil prices making investment in new oil sands plants less attractive. The other is the urgent need to address climate change much more aggressively, which also puts future oil sands investments at risk.


  
We can and should act to avoid catastrophic climate change

'There is a pathway to better growth that is staring us in the face, but has yet to be set out by any of the major parties as a future direction for our country: to make Canada a nation leading the way to a truly low-carbon economy,' writes David Crane.


  
Canada making serious mistake believing future will be as energy superpower: Crane

We should be thinking much harder about alternative ways to grow our future economy for the jobs and wealth we’ll need to sustain a decent standard of living.


  
Climate change plan should be priority for political parties in 2015 election: Crane

All federal political parties face a spotlight glare on climate, says columnist David Crane. Which will be willing to offer real and clear choices on our energy-environment future, with credible policies to back their plans up?


  
Canada needs political leadership to fight climate change: Harper’s failing, Mulcair has outlines, Trudeau’s waffling

There is now no hope of meeting our international commitment to lower annual greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 by 17 per cent below the 2005 level.


  
If things are so good, why do Canadians feel so lousy?

It won’t be that easy moving us to stronger growth and job creation. But we surely should do everything we can to improve the life chances for all Canadians rather than resigning ourselves to slow growth and diminished expectations.


  
Federal government an extraordinarily secretive organization

If we are to have engaged public policy discussion that draws on the collective knowledge, experience and ideas of Canadians we should end up with better policies. This applies to almost every area of public policy.


  
Need for a fairer and more representative voting system won't go away

In Canada's recent federal election, Prime Minister Stephen Harper was able to form a majority government with just under 40 per cent of the votes cast by Canadians. But is that fair?


  
Economy to grow, but in danger of being one with diminished expectations

Despite a focus on families, there is little discussion on how to counter the prospect of a decline in living standards and growing inequality.


  
Global competition for good jobs based on new ideas to become more intense as decade proceeds

Canada has to be ready. IRAP is one of the best vehicles we have to succeed in such a challenging world. Our future economy should be a top election issue.


  
Canada can't afford to sit back as other countries embrace technology, education and innovation

As it is, as a federal government discussion paper recently stated, 'there is some evidence to suggest that Canada is not well-positioned to be an innovation leader.' Another across-the-board corporate tax cut won't change that.


  
A more innovative economy would deliver more good jobs

But this is the issue that is largely missing from the Liberal economic strategy, yet it is central to our future.


  
Politicians should deal with climate change, create a stronger economy

If we are looking for economic stimulus to drive innovation and create new jobs, then launching a transformative shift to a low-carbon economy may be our best hope.


  
Innovation means embracing digital economy

But it also means ensuring that existing industries have the tools and people to become more innovative. It also means making the public sector more innovative.


  
We're laggards when it comes to new digital economy, despite doing many things right

We are not training the thousands of skilled people we will need for success. We are not digitizing our vast collections of cultural material. Our financial structure is failing to provide the risk capital innovators need to start new businesses.


  
Time for a strong minister of public health

Now there is a great need to promote exercise and healthy diet, including tough regulation of sugar and sodium content and requirements for public disclosure of sugar and salt content by fast-food restaurants.


  
Feds and Liberals should be offering more options to face challenges of an aging Canada

Kevin Page was right to point out the folly of ignoring the challenge, or delaying action for long, what he largely ignored was the potential for initiatives that could do much to mitigate the pessimistic forecasts of an aging society


  
Parliamentary Calendar
Tuesday, September 1, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
MPs, federal candidates take part in Ottawa's Capital Pride Parade, Aug. 23 Aug. 24, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

On Sunday, Aug. 23 Ottawa celebrated its 30th annual pride march through downtown. All four main political parties had a contingent in the parade, with the Liberals first in the line of marchers. Here Orleans candidate Andrew Leslie and a slightly hidden Ottawa South MP David McGuinty walk together, alongside dozens of supporters. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

Ottawa Centre Liberal candidate Catherine McKenna. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

More Liberal supporters march in the parade. Liberal MPP for Ottawa Centre Yasir Naqvi, Ottawa-West Nepean candidate Anita Vandenbeld, Kanata-Carleton candidate Karen McCrimmon, and Hull-Alymer candidate Greg Fergus were marching too. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

The local Green party contingent in the parade threw their support around Kanata-Carleton candidate Andrew West. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

The New Democrats making their way onto the parade route, flanked by local unions UFCW Locals 175 & 633, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC). 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

NDP candidate for Orleans Nancy Tremblay was all smiles next to Ottawa Centre MP Paul Dewar. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

Paul Dewar and the NDP supporters were yelling "Happy Pride" as they marched. Carleton candidate kc Larocque, Kanata-Carleton candidate John Hansen, Ottawa South candidate George Brown, and Nepean candidate Sean Devine were there, too. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

Despite a petition looking to ban the LGBTory contingent from marching in the parade, about two-dozen supporters took part, holding signs that included "I kissed a Tory and I liked it," and "I am Conservative, I support trans rights." The latter was inspired by backlash over Bill C-279,  the trans bill of rights that was killed by Conservative Senators during the last session of Parliament. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

Nepean Carleton MPP Lisa MacLeod, and Ottawa Centre federal candidate Damian Konstantinakos (far right) were the only politicians The Hill Times spotted among the LGBTory contingent.

Ontario Conservative MPP Lisa MacLeod. She also marched earlier this summer in the Toronto Pride Parade alongside Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

The LGBTorys were joined by Melissa Hudson, the chair of Trans-Action Group, a non-profit focused on Transgender health and employment. As well, some marchers carried signs, seen above, that list the 18 federal MPs past and present who "stand with" the LGBTorys. 

The Hill Times photograph by Rachel Aiello

The LGBTory contingent calls themselves the 'Rainbow Conservatives of Canada" according to a handout they had at their tent set up as part of the street fair alongside the parade. All parties had sign-up lists at their booths, looking to gain supporters and volunteers. On the handout, it says they want to "break the left wing monopoly on the LGBT community," and includes quotes from former Foreign Affairs minister John Baird, and former VP of the Ottawa Centre Conservative Association Fred Litwin

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE



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