Friday, March 6, 2015
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ECONOMY & INNOVATION
Climate change plan should be priority for political parties in 2015 election: Crane

All federal political parties face a spotlight glare on climate, says columnist David Crane. Which will be willing to offer real and clear choices on our energy-environment future, with credible policies to back their plans up?


  
Canada needs political leadership to fight climate change: Harper’s failing, Mulcair has outlines, Trudeau’s waffling

There is now no hope of meeting our international commitment to lower annual greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 by 17 per cent below the 2005 level.


  
If things are so good, why do Canadians feel so lousy?

It won’t be that easy moving us to stronger growth and job creation. But we surely should do everything we can to improve the life chances for all Canadians rather than resigning ourselves to slow growth and diminished expectations.


  
Federal government an extraordinarily secretive organization

If we are to have engaged public policy discussion that draws on the collective knowledge, experience and ideas of Canadians we should end up with better policies. This applies to almost every area of public policy.


  
Need for a fairer and more representative voting system won't go away

In Canada's recent federal election, Prime Minister Stephen Harper was able to form a majority government with just under 40 per cent of the votes cast by Canadians. But is that fair?


  
Economy to grow, but in danger of being one with diminished expectations

Despite a focus on families, there is little discussion on how to counter the prospect of a decline in living standards and growing inequality.


  
Global competition for good jobs based on new ideas to become more intense as decade proceeds

Canada has to be ready. IRAP is one of the best vehicles we have to succeed in such a challenging world. Our future economy should be a top election issue.


  
Canada can't afford to sit back as other countries embrace technology, education and innovation

As it is, as a federal government discussion paper recently stated, 'there is some evidence to suggest that Canada is not well-positioned to be an innovation leader.' Another across-the-board corporate tax cut won't change that.


  
A more innovative economy would deliver more good jobs

But this is the issue that is largely missing from the Liberal economic strategy, yet it is central to our future.


  
Politicians should deal with climate change, create a stronger economy

If we are looking for economic stimulus to drive innovation and create new jobs, then launching a transformative shift to a low-carbon economy may be our best hope.


  
Innovation means embracing digital economy

But it also means ensuring that existing industries have the tools and people to become more innovative. It also means making the public sector more innovative.


  
We're laggards when it comes to new digital economy, despite doing many things right

We are not training the thousands of skilled people we will need for success. We are not digitizing our vast collections of cultural material. Our financial structure is failing to provide the risk capital innovators need to start new businesses.


  
Time for a strong minister of public health

Now there is a great need to promote exercise and healthy diet, including tough regulation of sugar and sodium content and requirements for public disclosure of sugar and salt content by fast-food restaurants.


  
Feds and Liberals should be offering more options to face challenges of an aging Canada

Kevin Page was right to point out the folly of ignoring the challenge, or delaying action for long, what he largely ignored was the potential for initiatives that could do much to mitigate the pessimistic forecasts of an aging society


  
Time for an Innovation Canada Department, a ministry of the future

One of the biggest issues we face is how to build a much more innovative economy that can meet the challenges of 21st century global competition and sustain a high and sustainable quality of life with good jobs. Canada has to get cracking.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Friday, March 6, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
ITK hosts intimate preview of next week's Taste of the Arctic event March 2, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by John Major
ITK project coordinator Looee Okalik, using an 'ulu' or 'woman's knife' to cut off a portion of 'Nikku' or dried caribou.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
NAC Le Café's executive chef John Morris explaining his take on traditional Inuit menu items.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
First Air's Elisapee Sheutiapik, also former mayor of Iqaluit, with ITK health and social development assistant director Anna Fowler.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
First Air's Ron Lowry, Ms. Sheutiapik, ITK's Looee Okalik, iPolitics' Elizabeth Gray-Smith, ITK's Anna Fowler, The Hill Times' Rachel Aiello, First Air's Bert van der Stege, and ITK's Kathleen Tagoona.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
After the tasting, Chef John Morris joined the guests for the mini-feast of traditional Inuit foods.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
Chef John Morris spoons some jus on Ottawa Citizen food editor Peter Hum's plate.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
First Air's Ron Lowry and Bert van der Stege; and ITK President Terry Audla.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
ITK president Terry Audla digging in to the frozen Arctic char or 'Iqaluk' meat from the Rankin Inlet.
The Hill Times photograph by John Major
First Air's Ron Lowry adding a bit of seal fur to his suit.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE