ENERGY POLICY BRIEFING

The right to say ‘no’: why aboriginal veto power over resource extraction is a must

Cooperative relations between extractive industry proponents, governments, and aboriginal peoples begin with free, prior, and informed consent. The challenge for Canada is to ensure that this emerging best practice becomes standard practice in our extractive sector operations, domestically and internationally.

The 2014 Tsilhqot’in Nation v. British Columbia decision of the Supreme Court of Canada is suggested to be a game-changer for aboriginal-extractive industry relations. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

By ROBERTA RICE

PUBLISHED : Monday, Aug. 15, 2016 12:00 AM

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