How a 20-year-old patent application could upend Canada’s biggest trade deal

If the pharmaceutical giant succeeds, it will have effectively found a mechanism to override the Supreme Court of Canada and hold Canadian taxpayers liable for hundreds of millions in damages in the process. The cost to the health-care system could be enormous as the two Eli Lilly patents may be the proverbial tip of the iceberg and claims from other pharmaceutical companies could soon follow.

International Trade Minister Ed Fast and Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured in this file photo. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

By Michael Geist

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014 2:36 PM

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